GTAV MAP Learning Exercises: YEAR 10 wellbeing

Investigating wellbeing

Level: 10

Introduction

Human wellbeing refers to the ability of people everywhere to access the things that they need to live a happy and healthy life. The ability to live a happy and healthy life depends on a number of social, historical, economic, environmental, political and technological factors

Aims

In this series of lessons, you will use GIS maps to focus on some key social and economic factors that affect wellbeing, investigating how wealth and health varies across Australia.

Number of Lessons

2-3 lessons

LESSONS (CLICK EACH HEADING TO REVEAL THE SECTION)

Lesson 1: Social Indicators - Health

lesson 1: social indicators - health

To look at how the health of a population varies we shall consider patterns of disease in Australia.


1. What is meant by the term ‘disease’?


Opening the GTAV Map

  • Go to the GTAV – AURIN map website: https://gtav.aurin.org.au/


  • Click I agree to the disclaimer

Adding a map layer

  • On the left side, click on the blue Add data button
  • Click on the Year 10 Geographies of Human Wellbeing and click on the PHIDU – Prevalence of Selected Health Risk Factors/Chronic Diseases (SA2) 2011-2013”
  • Click Add to the Map. See screenshot below.


  • You can change the opacity of the map (intensity of colour/transparency) using the sliding scale above the legend. See screenshot below. Patterns are clearer to see (more defined) at 100% opacity.
  • You will notice there is a drop-down menu where you can change the layer displayed on the map. See screenshot below.


2) On a national scale, which of the four measures of health you’ve just added to your map occurs at the highest rate? (Look at the maps one at a time.) 

3) Carry out research to find out how obesity affects the wellbeing of people (their ability to live a happy and healthy life). Write a short summary here.

4) Why do you think this disease is the most prevalent in Australia? Consider risk factors such as the influence of cost of healthy food.

5) Zoom to Melbourne. What do you notice about the difference between rates of obesity between Inner Melbourne and outer suburbs?

6) Study the table below

a. Which of the factors in the table below would contribute most to the problem of obesity?

b. How does the data for this factor correlate (link) with the pattern of obesity you have observed on the map?


Source: https://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-14/australia-health-2016-report-card/7844002

  • Zoom into the area in which you live.
  • Turn the different layers on your map on and off to consider rates of smoking, diabetes and psychological distress by clicking on and off the box next to the name of the layer. You may want to ensure the opacity is at 100% so that patterns are clear to see.

7) Answer the following questions:

a. What do you notice about the health of people in this location?

b. How does the health of your region contrast with another area within Victoria?

c. How much does the data you are considering match with the table above? Justify this using data from the map, comparing the percentages from the map to the table above.


 

Lesson 2: Economic Indicators

Lesson 2: Economic Indicators

You will now consider some economic indicators of wellbeing, rather than social indicators observed in Lesson 1.


1. Explain why economic factors are important in determining the wellbeing of people.


Opening the GTAV Map

  • Go to the GTAV – AURIN map website: https://gtav.aurin.org.au/


  • Click I agree to the disclaimer

Adding a map layer

  • Click on the Remove all button to remove any datasets you may have open from previously
  • On the left side, click on the blue Add data button
  • Click on the Year 10 Geographies of Human Wellbeing and click on the NATSEM – OECD Indicators – Unemployment (SA2) 2011
  • Click Add to the Map. See screenshot below.


2) Zoom to Australia.

a. Which state or territory has the highest rate of unemployment?

b. Look at one of the locations that have an above 18.9% unemployment rate (dark pink on the map). Click on this location to reveal the table of statistics (named “Feature information”). Use the feature information to complete the table below, comparing this location (Location A) with the location where you live (Location B).


 Location ALocation B
Female Unemployment Rate (25-44)
Male Unemployment Rate 25-44
Unemployment Rate Overall


3) How does this Australia-wide unemployment rate compare to the two locations you chose in the table above?


  • Click on the Remove all button to remove any datasets you may have open from previously or open a new instance of the GTAV Map
  • On the left side, click on the blue Add data button
  • Click on the Year 10 Geographies of Human Wellbeing heading and click on the NATSEM – OECD Indicators – Unemployment (SA2) 2011
  • Click on Add to the map. See screenshot below.


Spend some time investigating this map at different scales across Australian, and examine some of the other variables/indicators in the drop down list on the left under Poverty Rate. Examine, for example, the relationship between Median (average) Income, and Poverty Rate.

4) Visit this consider this webpage: https://www.acoss.org.au/poverty

a. How is the poverty line measured?

b. What is the dollar figure for the poverty line, measured in $ per week for a single adult?

c. What percentage of people lives below the poverty line in Australia?

d. Could there be a link between levels of poverty and unemployment?

e. Looking at the poverty layer on the map, do you think there is a difference in poverty between inner city and rural areas? Give examples from the GRAV map to justify your opinion.


 

Lesson 3: Combining social and economic indicators of wellbeing

Lesson 3:Combining social and economic indicators of wellbeing

In this final section you will consider a combination of social and economic indicators that affect wellbeing. You will explore housing affordability in major cities which is a comparison of how much households will pay for rent, as a proportion of their income. If households use more than 30 per cent of their income to pay their rent, it classifies housing as ‘unaffordable’, ‘severely unaffordable’ or ‘extremely unaffordable’.

If they are also in the bottom 40% of the population in terms of household income, then their household is defined as experiencing housing stress.

 

Opening the GTAV Map

  • Go to the GTAV – AURIN map website: https://gtav.aurin.org.au/


  • Click I agree to the disclaimer

Adding a map layer

  • Click on the Remove all button to remove any datasets you may have open from previously
  • On the left side, click on the blue Add data button
  • Click on the Year 10 Geographies of Human Wellbeing and click on the SGS
    National Rental Affordability Index 3 Bedroom 2017
  • Click Add to the Map. See screenshot below.


1) Zoom in to look at the pattern in rental affordability in Melbourne.
a. How does rental affordability change from the centre of Melbourne to the suburbs?
b. Click on the measuring tool as shown in the screen shot below. Use the measuring tool to calculate how far from the centre of Melbourne you would have to travel (as the crow flies) to reach an ‘acceptable’ level of affordability?



3) Zoom in to Sydney to look at rental affordability.

a. Do you think Melbourne or Sydney would have greater affordability? Use the map to compare the two locations.

b. Count how many statistical areas in Sydney are classified as ‘extremely unaffordable’


Now change the time period to see how rental affordability in Sydney has changed. To do this, click on the drop-down menu in the legend and select First Quarter 2011. See screenshot below



c. How many statistical areas are classified as ‘extremely unaffordable’ in First quarter 2011?

d. Using the information from part iii) and iv), describe the change in housing affordability in Sydney between 2011 and 2017? (hint: has it become more or less affordable?).

e. How do you think this change affects the wellbeing of people living in Sydney?


 

Extension Activity: Investigating SEIFA - The Index of Relative Socio-Economic Disadvantage (IRSD)

Extension Activity: Investigating SEIFA - The Index of Relative Socio-Economic Disadvantage (IRSD)

The IRSD summarises variables that indicate relative disadvantage. This index ranks areas on a continuum from most disadvantaged to least disadvantaged. A low score on this index indicates a high proportion of relatively disadvantaged people in an area.

Opening the GTAV Map

  • Go to the GTAV – AURIN map website: https://gtav.aurin.org.au/


  • Click I agree to the disclaimer

Adding a map layer

  • Click on the Remove all button to remove any datasets you may have open from previously
  • On the left side, click on the blue Add data button
  • Click on the Year 10 Geographies of Human Wellbeing and click on the ABS SEIFA IRSAD by SA2 2016.
  • Click Add to the Map. See screenshot below.


1) What colour are the most disadvantaged areas?


.You can find out the name of the statistical areas and their ranking for disadvantage (1 being most disadvantaged) in the state and nationally by clicking on a region on the map to bring up the feature information box. The rank is shown as state_rank (See screenshot below)



2) Wellbeing can vary significantly over small areas. Identify one place on the map that shows big differences in the levels of disadvantage. Screenshot the map and then write a paragraph to describe the differences in disadvantage. You may like to use the measuring tool as well as the sentence structure below:


The region of [insert suburb name or SA2 name] is ranked ______ in terms of its relative disadvantage in the state, compared to [insert suburb name] which is ranked _____ in the state. The distance between the two is _____ km.